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Three Weeks with My Brother by Nicholas Sparks and Micah Sparks

Traveling Brothers

Summer time is vacation time, so I thought I’d look at some books about traveling, starting with Three Weeks with My Brother by Nicholas and Micah Sparks.  The Property Gnomes are also traveling this time with a field trip to my sister’s house.  Check them out at the end of the review.


Most people recognize the titles: The Notebook, Message in a Bottle, Nights in Rodanthe, A Walk to Remember—and the list goes on. To the outside world, internationally best-selling author Nicholas Sparks seems to have it all. He has over a dozen hugely successful novels, many of which have been made into movies. He has a loving wife and family. He seems blessed with the Midas touch. But reality steps in, and like everyone else, he has his own difficulties and dilemmas. 

Three Weeks with My Brother by Nicholas Sparks and Micah Sparks is a memoir about the Sparks brothers. It chronicles the brothers’ three-week whirlwind excursion around the world in 2003 to exotic locations like Peru, Easter Island, Australia, Cambodia, and Norway. We are with them on this once-in-a-lifetime trip, and then alternately led through their lives growing up, seeing the challenges they faced then and as adults.  Sometimes it can be humorous, like when Micah, the jokester, tries to get his photo taken in every sacred crypt on the trip.  Many times, it’s emotional. Health issues, relationship problems, and death all play roles that shape their lives. This book is about family ties, both uplifting and heartbreaking. It’s about the journey of two brothers.

Here are two more brothers, Jonathan and Drew Scott, on a trip to my sister Denise's garden.
Here they go wading by a barrel of spilled alyssum. 
They stop to pose by some purple clematis and blue hydrangeas.
They find some pink hydrangeas along the way.



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